One of the more interesting (and kinda gross) questions we’ve answered recently…

ucsdhealthsciences:

The awe of similar

Nature is famously conservative. If it does something right, it repeats the plan.

Sometimes, it’s obvious: The fractal patterns of river deltas, human kidneys and trees or the camouflaged stripes of tigers and chameleons.

Sometimes, technology reveals less obvious or unseen similarities. More fanciful, perhaps, but stunning nonetheless. Above are two images: One is a bright-field micrograph of a meadow buttercup floral bud, taken by Stephen S. Nagy, an honorable mention winner in the 2006 Nikon Small World microscopy contest. The other is a multi-photon fluorescence micrograph depicting intestinal villi of a mouse, taken by Thomas Deerinck at the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, which took 8th place in Nikon’s 2005 contest.

Which is which? Answer below.

Answer: Flower bud top; intestine below.

CRASH COURSE PSYCHOLOGY IS HERE!

Hank started his new course on Crash Course this week! Check it out.

wnycradiolab:

Scenes from "The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace."

A cool and pretty little video about Alfred Russel Wallace, who co-discovered natural selection along with Charles Darwin.

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Granular Poromya" (Poromya granulata)

…a unusual species of poromyid bivalve that occurs in the northern parts of the Atlantic ocean. P.granulata is unusual among bivalves because unlike most it is a carnivore, using its modified cowl-shaped siphon to catch its prey. To accomplish this P. granulata will draw water through its siphon and when it has trapped a food item it will rapidly retract it. In doing this the bivalve turns itself inside out and moves the food into the ‘mouth’. Which is an opening into the gizzard, where the food item will be ground up and passed onto the gut.

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Bivalvia-Anomalosdesmata-Pholadomyoida-Poromyidae-Poromya-P. granulata

Images: Brian Morton and Idscaro

Don’t know why, but the thought of a carnivorous bivalve is creepy. 

What Happens If You Go Without Water?

Ever wondered what happens to your body if you don’t get enough water? Our bodies are mostly water by weight, so in today’s episode of SciShow Hank explains what happens to your body as it starts to shut down when you go without that tasty H2O.

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Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow

Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow

Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow

Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com

Sources:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=football-water-weight-loss
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=symptoms
http://www.hydration.net.au/page/shop/info_page/a/infopage_id/e/46
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/why-your-body-needs-water.html
http://www.menshealth.co.uk/food-nutrition/drink-recipes/fight-the-six-stages-of-dehydration-347578
http://www.bodybio.com/content.aspx?page=elyte-electrolyte-101
http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003281.htm
http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/diet-fitness/information/question565.htm
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-03/fyi-it-ever-ok-drink-your-own-urine

thebrainscoop:

Zebra Bits (X)

Calendar: To-Do

What Is Wind?

We all know that warm air rises, but how does this scientific fact influence our weather and create those flows of air molecules that we know of as wind? In this episode of SciShow, Hank explains where wind comes from, what factors influence it, and how fast it can go!


—————-
Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow

Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow

Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow

Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com

Sources:
http://www.universetoday.com/82329/what-causes-wind/
http://atmo.tamu.edu/weather-and-climate/weather-whys/683-what-causes-wind
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/wind/what-causes-wind
http://www.iowaenergycenter.org/wind-energy-manual/wind-and-wind-power/what-causes-wind/
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream//synoptic/wind.htm
http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/earth/earths-atmosphere/wind/
http://www.atmos.illinois.edu/earths_atmosphere/wind_formation.html
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=where-does-wind-come-from

jtotheizzoe:

I am a certified Mars Rover pilot, and you can be too.

(Thanks to Mission To Mars 3D, anyway)

Chances are, if I polled 100 people on whether they’d like to command a space mission to Mars, or pilot a six-wheeled rover as if it were the universe’s most advanced remote-controlled vehicle (I mean, it has a nuclear power source, for cryin’ out loud), 99 of them would say HELL YES. I don’t know what the other person would be thinking, honestly.

Well, you can do that now. Thanks to a collaboration between the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy and Mozilla’s Ignite competition, you can simulate a future trip to the red planet inside your browser with the Mission to Mars 3D Experiment

This educational game/tool challenges you to plan and carry out two missions off the bat. First, you devise a rocket launch scheme to send an emergency resupply payload to a science colony on Mars, using a planetary orbit simulator. After you master “the slingshot”, you pilot a Mars Curiosity rover clone, using its onboard instruments to locate a good spot to drop a greenhouse module. I decided to launch my mission using the private SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, and had it arrive at Mars on my birthday … in 2038.

I’ll be old, but what a birthday present, eh?

The folks behind the project told me that the 3D platform is completely open source (their GitHub page) and missions can be remixed, but I haven’t played with that part yet. Teachers will enjoy the educational resources attached, because face it, this beats the physics lesson you had planned this week. 

See you on Mars! More info available on the Webmaker blog.

Oh yeah … and this is especially appropriate since India just launched a Mars mission today, and it was beautiful (more info on that from Emily Lakdawalla at The Planetary Society):

So cool!

thecrashcourse:

The History of Atomic Chemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #37

How did we get here? Well, in terms of Atomic Chemistry, Hank takes us on a tour of the folks that were part of the long chain of other folks who helped us get to these deeper understandings of the world. From Leucippus to Heisenberg to you - yes, YOU - the story of Atomic Chemistry is all wibbly-wobbly… and amazing.