SciShow

Sep 23

smartereveryday:

If you don’t already know this, there are two different versions of the mantis shrimp appendage.  I’m a big fan of the smasher myself, but some people prefer to stab their food.  A Smarter Every Day “InfoGIF”. 
Here’s the SED video on smashers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXrxCT0NpHo 
If you’re in the mood for some hardcore science, here’s an article you might enjoy:
http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~claverie/Thomas%20Claverie/Claverie%20et%20al.,%202010.pdf

smartereveryday:

If you don’t already know this, there are two different versions of the mantis shrimp appendage.  I’m a big fan of the smasher myself, but some people prefer to stab their food.  A Smarter Every Day “InfoGIF”. 

Here’s the SED video on smashers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXrxCT0NpHo 

If you’re in the mood for some hardcore science, here’s an article you might enjoy:

http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~claverie/Thomas%20Claverie/Claverie%20et%20al.,%202010.pdf

Sep 22

[video]

humanoidhistory:

September 22, 1969 — Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Alan Bean pose for an official NASA photo.
(NASA)

humanoidhistory:

September 22, 1969 — Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Alan Bean pose for an official NASA photo.

(NASA)

Sep 20

[video]

Sep 19

edwardspoonhands:

SciShow Talk Show days are the best.

Damn straight!

edwardspoonhands:

SciShow Talk Show days are the best.

Damn straight!

[video]

[video]

Sep 18

[video]

[video]

brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection

"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection

"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. 

During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.

Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”

Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8
Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

(via scinerds)