commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.
Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Check out that second link for some sweet, sweet nerdy tunes!

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Check out that second link for some sweet, sweet nerdy tunes!

4 Important Lessons from the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

SciShow Space celebrates the 45th anniversary of the first moon landing by highlighting just four of the most important things we learned from the Apollo 11 mission. Subscribe!

Why Do We Blush?

Aw, don’t be embarrassed—everyone does it! Quick Questions explains what causes blushing, which Darwin called “the most peculiar and most human of all expressions.”

mineralists:

Hematite and Rutile inside Quartz from Novo Horizonte, Brazil

Rogue Planets, Loners of the Universe

Meet one of the newest celestial bodies to be discovered: rogue planets, worlds that hurtle around the galaxy without any parent star. Caitlin Hofmeister explains how we found them, and where we think they might have come from.

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Oh, quantum mechanics—you enchanting, treacherous minx!
My favorite Hank Green quote thus far (SciShow Episode: “Moore’s Law and The Secret World of Ones and Zeroes”)

edwardspoonhands:

I missed this SciShow outtakes video while I was on tour and DAMN IT IS AWESOME! Thanks to our new editor Sarah for putting it together.

Check it!

Graphene: The Next Big (But Thin) Thing

If you haven’t heard of it before, you have now. And it may prove to be the next big thing in materials science. SciShow explains what it is, why it’s so awesome, and what challenges we face in harnessing its amazing properties.

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.