Astronaut Weightlessness Training

SciShow Space takes you behind the scenes of astronaut training, to show how crew members and their equipment are tested in microgravity, all while never having to leave Earth.

spacewatching:

Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.
Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth’s surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system.

spacewatching:

Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.

Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth’s surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system.

The Supernova of 1054, Our Very Special “Guest Star”

All of humanity likely saw it, a brilliant supernova that lit up the daytime sky in 1054. But 960 years later, there’s still a lot we dont quite understand about the famous celestial phenomenon.

Comet Chase & Molten Moons

In this episode of SciShow Space News, Hank details the work of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft. He also explains the new discoveries of Jupiter’s moon Io.

itsfullofstars:

Google Chrome Experiment: A Spacecraft for All

Chronicling the journey of the ISEE-3 space probe from its launch in 1978, the first-ever comet flyby, to a recent crowd-funded effort to contact and gain control of the decommissioned craft.

I'm confused on the nature of gravity in space. Why is it called "zero gravity"?

First, there’s gravity everywhere. We’ve got a whole episode on it. But we also have this unit of force called the g-force, sometimes abbreviated as G (though this isn’t a technical SI unit.) One G is the amount of force we all experience because of the Earth’s gravity all the time. Two Gs would be double that…we can experience this much force if we’re accelerating away from earth or on a planet two-times more massive than earth (but the same size.) Likewise, if we are in constant freefall (as astronauts are when they orbit the earth) they will experience no Gs at all.  We would call that “Zero G” which is not, oddly enough, the same thing as “zero gravity.” Gravity is a force…not amount of force, and just because you are under the influence of gravity (as everything in the universe is (as far as we know)) does not mean you are feeling “G forces.”

-Hank

What’s It Like on Mercury?

SciShow Space takes you on a tour of Mercury, the sun’s closest friend, where a year is just a day and half long, and the surface holds many surprises — like ice!

Our Next Mission to Mars, and How the Sun Will Kill the Internet

SciShow Space shares the latest news from around the universe, including new details about our next mission to Mars, and a study that predicts a catastrophic solar storm may be more likely than we thought.

sagansense:

crookedindifference:

Astronauts to brew coffee on space station with ISSpresso machine

Astronauts be like…..

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We’re getting ever closer to making the Nutrimatic Drinks Dispenser be a real thing, y’all (sort of).

SciShow Space News: SpaceX’s Awesome New Craft, and ‘Mega-Earth’ Discovered

SciShow Space gives you the latest news from around the universe, including the discovery of a new class of exoplanet dubbed a “mega-Earth,” and a tour of SpaceX’s new crewed vehicle, the Dragon V2.

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