One of the more interesting (and kinda gross) questions we’ve answered recently…

thecrashcourse:

the-fault-in-my-green-light:

CRASH COURSE HAS A MILLION SUBSCRIBERS! Congratulation!

Woohoo! Thank you! -Meredith

Congratulations to Crash Course and welcome to the Million Subscribers Club! We’ll see you at the club house later, right?

New Moon, New Disease, New Hero!


This edition of SciShow News really is full of “news.” Scientists have discovered a new moon orbiting Neptune, a new tick-borne virus threatening the United States, and a new species of shrew who is a real hero. Let’s get to it!

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Sources
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2013/30/full/
http://www.ajtmh.org/content/early/2013/07/18/ajtmh.13-0209.full.pdf+html
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2013.0486

Cyborg Eyes and Stumpy the Dumpy Tree Frog

SciShow graphics guy Louey Winkler discusses LED contact lenses and the implications of enhancing and assisting human beings with technology, and then attempts to stump Hank with a physics riddle. Jessi from Animal Wonders shares Stumpy the Whites tree frog.

How To: Make Antivenom

Bitten by a venomous snake? There’s hope! French scientist Albert Calmette developed the first snake antivenom in the late 1890s, and did such a good job that we use his technique to this day. Antivenom works by stimulating the production of antibodies which can smother venom’s toxic effects, preventing spread and rendering them harmless. But how do you make it? Well, stay tuned to this episode of SciShow to find out.

Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow
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References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-5FF8

Gluten

What’s the problem with gluten? Gluten is a sticky protein composite found in cereal grains. Hank gives us some insight into the importance of gluten in history, as well as its impact on health in our own time. 

Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-5E72

Weird Places: Waitomo Caves

Hank brings you the tale of another weird place on earth - the Waitomo Caves of New Zealand, where glowworms emit bluish-green light in a beautiful display.

The Manhattan Project

Some of the greatest advances in science have come from humanity’s more destructive impulses. This is not the fault of science - when we discover powerful truths about the universe it’s up to us to decide how to use them because they can either be boons or banes to the world. There may be no better example of this than the work done by the Manhattan Project - the years long, multinational effort to develop an atomic bomb during World War II. The project created unfathomably destructive weapons and led to a 50 year Cold War with the USSR, but is also the source of a lot of information about the atom we didn’t have before, which has led to advances in many beneficial fields, like energy production and medicine. Science, like history, is always complicated.

Earlier today, mission specialists with NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory announced that they have found, for the first time, evidence of an ancient environment on Mars that could have sustained life.  Hank tells us the specifics in this very special, super-exciting episode of SciShow News.

The Search for Antimatter

If you don’t have any idea what antimatter is, you don’t have to feel bad - the brightest minds in the world have only recently begun to understand what it is and how it works. Hank gives us the run down on what we know about antimatter, and what we’re still trying to figure out.