SciShow News: New Elements and Exploding Whales

Hank introduces you to the latest element to be created — and explains why we make them in the first place — plus the science of exploding whales. It’s a thing, people. A messy, smelly thing.

wnycradiolab:

Scenes from "The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace."

A cool and pretty little video about Alfred Russel Wallace, who co-discovered natural selection along with Charles Darwin.

What Happens If You Go Without Water?

Ever wondered what happens to your body if you don’t get enough water? Our bodies are mostly water by weight, so in today’s episode of SciShow Hank explains what happens to your body as it starts to shut down when you go without that tasty H2O.

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Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com

Sources:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=football-water-weight-loss
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=symptoms
http://www.hydration.net.au/page/shop/info_page/a/infopage_id/e/46
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/why-your-body-needs-water.html
http://www.menshealth.co.uk/food-nutrition/drink-recipes/fight-the-six-stages-of-dehydration-347578
http://www.bodybio.com/content.aspx?page=elyte-electrolyte-101
http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003281.htm
http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/diet-fitness/information/question565.htm
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-03/fyi-it-ever-ok-drink-your-own-urine

What Is Wind?

We all know that warm air rises, but how does this scientific fact influence our weather and create those flows of air molecules that we know of as wind? In this episode of SciShow, Hank explains where wind comes from, what factors influence it, and how fast it can go!


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Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow

Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow

Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow

Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com

Sources:
http://www.universetoday.com/82329/what-causes-wind/
http://atmo.tamu.edu/weather-and-climate/weather-whys/683-what-causes-wind
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/wind/what-causes-wind
http://www.iowaenergycenter.org/wind-energy-manual/wind-and-wind-power/what-causes-wind/
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream//synoptic/wind.htm
http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/earth/earths-atmosphere/wind/
http://www.atmos.illinois.edu/earths_atmosphere/wind_formation.html
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=where-does-wind-come-from

Thank you to everyone who likes us on Facebook! We have over 90,000 fans as of November 6th, and we are delighted to be sharing awesome science with every one of you!
Now if only we could get as many Tumblr followers!

Thank you to everyone who likes us on Facebook! We have over 90,000 fans as of November 6th, and we are delighted to be sharing awesome science with every one of you!

Now if only we could get as many Tumblr followers!

Innovating Technology & The Veiled Chameleon

Hank talks with University of Montana Professor Rick Hughes about innovating technology and training the SciShow staff. Special guest appearance with Jessi and Veiled Chameleon ‘Twirly’.

Want more animals? Check out Animal Wonders Inc. at http://www.animalwonders.org or on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/anmlwndrs
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Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow
Or subscribe over at: https://subbable.com/scishow

Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow

"Billions upon billions" of thanks to Keith Chiem, who supported us on Subbable  - all SciShow videos are now filmed in The Keith Chiem Studio!

"Billions upon billions" of thanks to Keith Chiem, who supported us on Subbable  - all SciShow videos are now filmed in The Keith Chiem Studio!

thebrainscoop:

jtotheizzoe:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!
Today, October 15, Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace is celebrated as the first female computer programmer (she programmed Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” in the mid-19th century). Nearly a century after her work, she inspired Alan Turing’s research and generations of women to go forth into the sciences.
Today, Lovelace Day celebrants are holding a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon to increase the number and detail of female STEM entries in Wikipedia. Of course, you don’t have to just do that today. You could do it any day of the year. Or every day of the year, for that matter. In fact, instead of editing Wikipedia to add more women, maybe one day we’ll just edit Wikipedia and it will, I dunno, just happen?
Finally, Ada Lovelace Day is about more than just Ada. It’s about all women in science, past and present.
Ladies and gents, who is the female science role model you’d like to celebrate today?

I want to celebrate all of the fantastic female researchers and scientists and biologists and anthropologists at The Field Museum! Many of them have had personal and positive impacts on my life and career, like 
Anna Goldman for pursuing her interests with a fiery passion and being a strong role model for many people in her preparation lab, 
Corrie Moreau as the Assistant Curator of insects for the people she inspires in her ant lab and her devotion to promoting women in science, 
Janet Voight as Assistant Curator of Invertebrates for the many years she has committed to pursuing expertise and innovation in her field,
and all of the other incredible women researchers, staff, volunteers and interns at our Museum who touch lives every day! 

Ada Lovelace got the SciShow treatment a few months ago - revisit our video here!

thebrainscoop:

jtotheizzoe:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Today, October 15, Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace is celebrated as the first female computer programmer (she programmed Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” in the mid-19th century). Nearly a century after her work, she inspired Alan Turing’s research and generations of women to go forth into the sciences.

Today, Lovelace Day celebrants are holding a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon to increase the number and detail of female STEM entries in Wikipedia. Of course, you don’t have to just do that today. You could do it any day of the year. Or every day of the year, for that matter. In fact, instead of editing Wikipedia to add more women, maybe one day we’ll just edit Wikipedia and it will, I dunno, just happen?

Finally, Ada Lovelace Day is about more than just Ada. It’s about all women in science, past and present.

Ladies and gents, who is the female science role model you’d like to celebrate today?

I want to celebrate all of the fantastic female researchers and scientists and biologists and anthropologists at The Field Museum! Many of them have had personal and positive impacts on my life and career, like 

Anna Goldman for pursuing her interests with a fiery passion and being a strong role model for many people in her preparation lab, 

Corrie Moreau as the Assistant Curator of insects for the people she inspires in her ant lab and her devotion to promoting women in science, 

Janet Voight as Assistant Curator of Invertebrates for the many years she has committed to pursuing expertise and innovation in her field,

and all of the other incredible women researchers, staff, volunteers and interns at our Museum who touch lives every day! 

Ada Lovelace got the SciShow treatment a few months ago - revisit our video here!

WHY DID SCIENTISTS MAKE RATS GLOW?

Hank explains why scientists spend so much time and brain power making animals that glow. Well, first thing is, they don’t really glow. And second thing is: Scientists are just like the rest of us in that they don’t believe some things until they see them. Details inside.

5 AMAZING FACTS ABOUT BABIES

You know what’s weird? Babies. They cry but don’t produce tears; they can crawl before they can … crawl. And they have MORE BONES THAN YOU! Learn more about these and other odd truths about newborn miniature humans.


Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow or subscribe to our Subbable at https://subbable.com/scishow

Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow