thebrainscoop:

jtotheizzoe:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!
Today, October 15, Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace is celebrated as the first female computer programmer (she programmed Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” in the mid-19th century). Nearly a century after her work, she inspired Alan Turing’s research and generations of women to go forth into the sciences.
Today, Lovelace Day celebrants are holding a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon to increase the number and detail of female STEM entries in Wikipedia. Of course, you don’t have to just do that today. You could do it any day of the year. Or every day of the year, for that matter. In fact, instead of editing Wikipedia to add more women, maybe one day we’ll just edit Wikipedia and it will, I dunno, just happen?
Finally, Ada Lovelace Day is about more than just Ada. It’s about all women in science, past and present.
Ladies and gents, who is the female science role model you’d like to celebrate today?

I want to celebrate all of the fantastic female researchers and scientists and biologists and anthropologists at The Field Museum! Many of them have had personal and positive impacts on my life and career, like 
Anna Goldman for pursuing her interests with a fiery passion and being a strong role model for many people in her preparation lab, 
Corrie Moreau as the Assistant Curator of insects for the people she inspires in her ant lab and her devotion to promoting women in science, 
Janet Voight as Assistant Curator of Invertebrates for the many years she has committed to pursuing expertise and innovation in her field,
and all of the other incredible women researchers, staff, volunteers and interns at our Museum who touch lives every day! 

Ada Lovelace got the SciShow treatment a few months ago - revisit our video here!

thebrainscoop:

jtotheizzoe:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Today, October 15, Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace is celebrated as the first female computer programmer (she programmed Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” in the mid-19th century). Nearly a century after her work, she inspired Alan Turing’s research and generations of women to go forth into the sciences.

Today, Lovelace Day celebrants are holding a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon to increase the number and detail of female STEM entries in Wikipedia. Of course, you don’t have to just do that today. You could do it any day of the year. Or every day of the year, for that matter. In fact, instead of editing Wikipedia to add more women, maybe one day we’ll just edit Wikipedia and it will, I dunno, just happen?

Finally, Ada Lovelace Day is about more than just Ada. It’s about all women in science, past and present.

Ladies and gents, who is the female science role model you’d like to celebrate today?

I want to celebrate all of the fantastic female researchers and scientists and biologists and anthropologists at The Field Museum! Many of them have had personal and positive impacts on my life and career, like 

Anna Goldman for pursuing her interests with a fiery passion and being a strong role model for many people in her preparation lab, 

Corrie Moreau as the Assistant Curator of insects for the people she inspires in her ant lab and her devotion to promoting women in science, 

Janet Voight as Assistant Curator of Invertebrates for the many years she has committed to pursuing expertise and innovation in her field,

and all of the other incredible women researchers, staff, volunteers and interns at our Museum who touch lives every day! 

Ada Lovelace got the SciShow treatment a few months ago - revisit our video here!

jtotheizzoe:

Why the Scientist Stereotype Is Bad for Everyone, Especially Kids
Michael Brooks writes at Wired Science:

To many – too many – science is something like North Korea. Not only is it impossible to read or understand anything that comes out of that place, there are so many cultural differences that it’s barely worth trying. It’s easier just to let them get on with their lives while you get on with yours; as long as they don’t take our jobs or attack our way of life, we’ll leave them in peace.

We’ve disconnected the image of the scientist too far from the reality of the scientist. Our creative sides, our individualism, our addiction to the feeling of wonder, our pure love for knowledge … replaced in the minds of the public with (men only) white coats, bald heads, and maniacal intentions. 
It’s a good read for anyone in science who wants to know how to change the equation. It’s a must-read for those outside of science who want to know what we’re really like.
Because the stereotype is way off. Some of us are dudes in cool shirts with sunglasses on and maybe even a penchant to take dramatic pictures with things written on our hands.
Also seems like a good time for everyone to revisit This Is What A Scientist Looks Like.
(via Wired Science)

jtotheizzoe:

Why the Scientist Stereotype Is Bad for Everyone, Especially Kids

Michael Brooks writes at Wired Science:

To many – too many – science is something like North Korea. Not only is it impossible to read or understand anything that comes out of that place, there are so many cultural differences that it’s barely worth trying. It’s easier just to let them get on with their lives while you get on with yours; as long as they don’t take our jobs or attack our way of life, we’ll leave them in peace.

We’ve disconnected the image of the scientist too far from the reality of the scientist. Our creative sides, our individualism, our addiction to the feeling of wonder, our pure love for knowledge … replaced in the minds of the public with (men only) white coats, bald heads, and maniacal intentions.

It’s a good read for anyone in science who wants to know how to change the equation. It’s a must-read for those outside of science who want to know what we’re really like.

Because the stereotype is way off. Some of us are dudes in cool shirts with sunglasses on and maybe even a penchant to take dramatic pictures with things written on our hands.

Also seems like a good time for everyone to revisit This Is What A Scientist Looks Like.

(via Wired Science)